Can you help me with my Resume?

I sure can 😀
In fact, ‘resume make-overs’ are how I got started, unofficially, as an HR consultant a handful of years ago.

After many years of recruiting in a variety of industries, I’ve seen thousands of resumes and interacted with hundreds of candidates. I’ve also worked on both ends of applicant tracking software (that system to apply online and upload your resume) and have an insight in how these systems process your resume too. It’s easy to get someone to read a resume you email them directly, but how do you stand out when a computer screens your application? I have a few tricks that will help with this.

Being a recruiter is a tough job. Many people struggle to communicate clearly and effectively about what they want to acocmplish in their next role. Discovering a candidate articulates their ‘why’ and presents a clear message about what they want is a rarity.

By design, a resume is rooted in the past. While past experience and education are important in determining the basics of being qualified, there is a reason that the rear view mirror is smaller than the windshield…we’re not going in that direction. Your resume should include a statement describing what you want, where you’re headed, and the next position you want to fill. Please, on behalf of recruiters everywhere, no more: Objective: to gain employment at your esteemed company. <groan>

That being said, transforming your resume into a document that highlights the past (keywords are important!) and presents your skills, certifications and qualifications effectively can be a challenge. No one wants to read a five -page life story and for most experienced professionals a one-pager just won’t cut it.

The purpose of your resume document is simply to move you to the next step. That’s it.

Kind of like going through airport security, you need to accomplish a handful of important things quickly in order to move you into the next step of the recruiting process. You want a resume that leaves the reader intrigued and interested to meet you. You want the first set of eyes on your resume to be able to rapidly discern that you meet the basic qualifications for the role (this part is easy). Most importantly, you want them to see that you stand out personality wise for the interesting and intelligent human you are and tht you are someone they really want to work with. It’s a little like dating honestly 😉

Let me work with you and your current resume to create a beautifully formatted, unique document that showcases and articulates your skills, states your why, and gets you in front of the decision makers that will look forward to meeting you when they invite you in to interview for a new role.

New Resume and re-design packages start at $155 CAD. Contact me today to get started.

Negotiating a Job Offer

Negotiating a job offer is a tricky part of the process that an HR Consultant can assist you with. Having been on both sides of a job offer, and having negotiated hundreds of them in my career as an HR Professional, I can offer you support, advice and guidance through this process.

Things to consider:

  1. Your Total Compensation – not just your base salary, but the dollar total of everything you will recieve as an employee. This includes your base salary, but also includes things like variable pay or bonus payments, employer RRSP contributions, education amounts, paid time off, and the value of your health and dental group benefits package.
  2. Your position – if you are leaving an existing job to take something new your negotiating point is different that if you were previously unemployed.
  3. Your charachter – a great candidate that is impressive in the interview stage only to become a demanding manipulative communicator during the negotiation stage is a huge red flag for the employer. Having a strategy for your negotiation is not only nescessary but also clever.

Contact us today to learn how we can help you as an individual or as a business in presenting or negotiating a job offer.

#newjob #offer #joboffer #offerletter #smallbusiness #yycbusiness #humanresources #hr #compensation #totalcompensation #negotiate

How Can an HR Consultant Help your Business?

Hiring an HR Consultant is a great idea for a number of reasons. They are specialized in areas such as employee performance management, recruiting, group benefits, disability management, leadership training and more. Practicing HR is more than just providing your employees with a paycheck every few weeks.  Even a few hours a month of the services of an HR consultant can move the needle on initiatives within your business that will translate into more productivity and a happier, healthier workforce. As many ares of Human Resources involve many hours of administrtive work, hiring a specialist who is skilled in a professional area of practice, can often handle this work in a shorter period of time than someone who hasn’t done it before.

Consider hiring an HR consultant to be a point of contact for your staff or your management for practical solutions and solid advice to everyday problems and issues that you need taken care of in a professional and knowledgable manner.

#humanresources #hr #employeeengagement #employeebenefits #managers #smallbusiness

Termination as a Service

Employer initiated termination is a risky and emotionally charged transaction. If you have identified the need to terminate one of your staff, so long as it is ‘without cause’, employers are within their rights to do this at almost any time.

Working with a professional advisor to help you carry out this process can mitigate your risk and ensure it is carried out in a respectful manner that sets your departed employee up for as much success as possible following.

HR Help offers Termination-as-a-Service to assist employers and business owners in this process. We can assist you with without cause terminations** by:

  • Consultation beforehand and providing ongoing support you and your staff throughout the process. This includes coaching you on what to say and what not to say as well as the option for us to attend and carry out the meeting with you.
  • Drafting the communication to present to your employee,  a letter advising of the details outlining the transaction as well as a full and final release if they are offered a severance;
  • Assistance to determine what amount of notice and amounts must be paid and when;
  • Liaising with the terminated employee during the time between the termination meeting and collecting their signed release and company assets back; and
  • Working together to develop a communication plan to your remaining employees.

There are many, many factors to consider for your business, your departed employee, and your remaining employees when a business decision of this magnitude is carried out and you don’t have to go at it alone.  Contact us today to learn more about our packages and service offerings to support you with an employer initiated without cause termination.

**I am not a lawyer, and I am not at all qualified to provide you with legal advice.  However, what I can do, is use my years of experience and prior consultation with lawyers on similar without cause termination transactions to help you formulate a solution and create documentation that is right for you and your business.  It is always in your best interest to seek appropriate legal counsel on matters such as employment termination. 

What’s the difference between a Recruiter and an HR Advisor?

A short while ago I answered this very enquiry on Quora:

Being a Recruiter:
Someone who functions specifically on recruiting dedicates their focus to the process of hiring. This includes creating and posting job descriptions on a variety of media (print, social media, job boards, professional associations, etc), collecting and screening candidates who apply for posted positions (either manually or using software to do so), corresponding with and managing relationships with the candidates throughout the process, making a job offer to selected candidates and delivering the message to candidates that were not successful.

Recruiters are incredibly skilled at managing multiple priorities, needs and relationships in time sensitive environments.  The keys to success as a recruiter are to have a thorough understanding of the business to be able to gauge both the needs and expectations of hiring managers, the fit of the individual with the organizational culture and the knowledge, skills and abilities of the applicants alongside the role they are applying for.  Interpersonal skills and spidey senses are a must. Interviewing is a little like dating. You have to learn as much as you can about an individual in a very short period of time to make a recommendation on whether or not you want to enter into an employment relationship with them.  Given we spend most of our lives at work, recruiters are key to the success and prosperity of an organization in the role they play to select qualified, emotionally intelligent, growth minded, resilient professionals to not only do a job, but grow and fit into a team and a corporate culture. They will often team up with a technical specialist to asses a candidates skills on a variety of fronts before making a recommendation to a hiring manager on who to extend an offer to.  This process is carried out in tandem with as many roles as are posted at any one time. Once a candidate is hired (or not), the recruiters interaction with the candidate either ceases or is taken over by the HR Specialist and their hiring manager/team.

Being an HR Advisor/Generalist/Specialist:
An HR professional can and may have recruiting as one of the responsibilities of their job function.  However, what sets them apart from recruiters is that they also have a number of other functions and tasks that they are responsible for that serve the needs of the staff and the business. (My personal opinion is that recruiting is an essential component to a business and should have dedicated specialists that can fulfill this function as opposed to it being ‘one-of-many’ things on the plate of an HR Specialist)

The tasks and areas of responsibility that someone in HR would have that a recruiter would typically not include;

  • on boarding and orientation of newly hired employees
  • providing support and coaching to leaders and employees in areas of professional development, learning and training, performance management, communication, change management, and business strategy and process
  • advising on rights and responsibilities of the organization and its employees in situations where being legally compliant is essential (process development, termination, performance or disability management)
  • administering payroll, group benefits, annual compliance, employee engagement, health and safety programs, and the like
  • all of the behind the scenes work to formulate and execute a compensation strategy that is competitive, suited to your geography, market, industry, and pays your people fairly
  • maintaining and creating documentation around employee records of any life-cycle changes such as hiring or exiting the organization, promotions, payroll records, compensation changes, benefits applications/forms/changes, performance reviews/feedback, disciplinary notice, change of address/name/position/employment status
  • creating and updating relevant communication of policies, procedures, guidelines, best practices and compliance
  • organization and execution of staff and company events
  • organization and facilitation of learning, knowledge, and communication sessions
  • provide day-to-day advice to employees and leadership on anything and everything related to their employment (group benefits, payroll, policies, etc)
  • terminations and the logistics they entail

There are many, many, more things to add to the general dumping ground of HR and listed above are just a few.  The beauty of working in HR is that no two organizations do it quite the same and if you are lucky enough to join a team or an organization that allows you to leverage your individual strengths, you can build a solid and fulfilling career.